University of Nottingham Malaysia

Liberal Arts BA (Hons)

     
  

Fact file

Qualification: BA (Hons)
Fees: Malaysian – RM28,500 per year, Non-Malaysian – RM34,600 per year
Mode: 3 years, Full-time
Intake: September
Campus: Malaysia

Course overview

Changes in the global economy, increasing challenges in employment and new opportunities arising from technological innovation have made the Liberal Arts degree a valuable asset – one that is recognised by employers and governments across the world. This is due to the capacity for this type of degree to foster creativity as well as ensuring that students have a broad range of skills and experiences.

The core modules in this programme equip students with relevant research skills in the Arts & Social Sciences. These are regarded as life-long learning skills, culminating in a Dissertation, which require students to apply these skills to develop a written project of 10,000 words in an area relevant to the field. The modules also include a business component that will enhance students’ employability; and a language component that offers students the opportunity to learn a chosen language from Beginners to Advanced level. This is also a crucial skill for employability and increases the ‘international’ portfolio of the student. The optional Arts & Social Sciences modules allow students to study from a range of disciplines to create an original academic portfolio in the areas of Education; English; Culture, Film & Media; and Politics, History & International Relations.

The Liberal Arts programme at the University of Nottingham also incorporates established traditions to create a degree that offers a genuinely global perspective. What is significant for Liberal Arts students is that they can use the three campuses to develop a unique curriculum that reflects their interests and helps to build their own unique profile. For example, a student from the Malaysia campus will benefit from studying for a semester in the UK or China by taking modules in business, politics and economics that might not feature within their programme at home.

Entry requirements

Our Foundation course route

Our Foundation courses give you another way to study for an undergraduate degree. 

Entry requirements
A Level BBC, excluding critical thinking and general studies
IB Diploma  28 points with 5,5,4 at Higher Level
STPM  B+B+B, excluding Pengajian Am
UEC  1 A and 4 B3s, excluding Bahasa Malaysia and Chinese language
SAM or other Australian matriculations   ATAR 82 (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects)
Canadian Ontario Grade 12 Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)

77% average based on 6 subjects (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects)

Canadian Secondary School Diplomas from other provinces are acceptable and to be assessed based on the University's requirements

Advance Placement (AP) 4,4,3 in relevant subjects. Applicants taking non-preferred subjects may be made an offer across more than three subjects at Advanced Placement level.
Diploma - Other Institutions  Acceptance to the second year is on a case by case basis (and at the discretion of the School) but normally would require an overall GPA of 3.3 (out of 4) or 70% and above (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects), and previous studies must meet the prerequisite requirements to the programme
Foundation - Other Institutions  Acceptance is at the discretion of the School but normally would require an overall GPA of 3.0 (out of 4) or 65% and above (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects), and previous studies must meet the prerequisite requirements for the programme
University of Nottingham Malaysia Foundation Successful completion of the Foundation in Arts and Education or Business and Management programme.

We strongly encourage all interested students to apply. Our students come to us with a diverse range of qualifications and we also consider applicants' personal statement, references and interview performance (if you have one) when making a decision. The only way for us to fully determine eligibility is through the submission of a completed application.

Entry requirements in the prospectus and website may not always apply and individual offers may vary.

English language requirements
IELTS (Academic):  IELTS: 6.5 (with no less than 6.0 in each element)
TOEFL (iBT):  87 (minimum 20 in speaking and 19 in all other elements)

GCE A Level English Language or English Literature:

grade C 

GCE AS Level English Language or English Literature:  

grade C 
PTE (Academic): 71 (with no less than 65 in each element)
SPM:  grade A-
1119 (GCE-O): grade B
GCSE O Level:  grade C

IGCSE (first language):

grade C  

IGCSE (second language): 

grade B 
MUET: Band 4
UEC:  grade A2
IB English A1 or A2 (Standard or Higher): 4 points 
IB English B (Higher Level): 4 points 
IB English B (Standard Level): 5 points 

IELTS ,TOEFL and PTE (Academic) test results must be less than 2 years old and all IELTS must be the academic version of the test. MUET results are valid for five years from the date of the release of results.

 

 

Foundation

The Foundation in Arts and Education is a 1+3 year programme that results in direct progression to the undergraduate degrees offered within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. This rigorous programme provides students with a strong academic background that will result in enhanced language, communication, critical thinking and study skills.  

Students on this programme also chose from a range of elective modules that provide the opportunity to sample topics related to their chosen undergraduate pathway such as politics, the world economy, media and education.

Modules

Year one

Typical core modules  

Applied Research Methods

To provide an integrative approach to psychology through the use of scientific method, enabling students to critically assess previous research and to design conduct, analyse, and report their own studies. This course is designed to equip students with appropriate procedures for describing data statistically and qualitatively. By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • Select and conduct simple statistical hypothesis procedures.
  • Appreciate the importance of qualitative research in real world settings and decide when a research topic requires a qualitative research methods.
  • Draw appropriate conclusion from statistical results.
  • Conduct interviews, facilitate focus groups and archival research, and analyse qualitative data. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and Understanding: 
    • The theoretical underpinnings of areas of research and practice in applied psychology.
  • Intellectual Skills: 
    • Effective quantitative and qualitative problem solving and decision making skills. 
    • The ability to conduct research into applied psychology and/or business and management issues, either individually or as part of a team.
  • Transferable (Key) Skills: 
    • Effective self-management in terms of time, planning and behaviour, motivation, self-starting, individual initiative, and enterprise. 
    • Problem-solving in applied psychology, and being able to integrate applied psychology with management studies. 
Beginners French, German, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin or Spanish (full year)

Students will learn and practise the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing together with basic grammatical structures. This will enable them to manipulate the language and participate effectively in everyday social situations. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • Pronunciation.
  • Standard spelling.
  • Ab initio syntax.
  • Ab initio sentence semantics.
  • Gist comprehension and more detailed reconstruction of audio material.
  • Basic oral skills. 
  • Intellectual skills. 
Business Economics
The module aims to introduce participants to key economic tools, concepts, and their application and to provide participants with an understanding of the nature and scope of economic policy and the economic theories upon which it is based. The emphasis is on policy. In particular, this module aims to offer a rigorous understanding of basic economic principles by combining theory and application to contemporary issues. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • The development, access and operation of markets for resources, goods and services.   
  • A coherent core of economic principles, including the microeconomics of decision and choice, production and exchange and the macroeconomics of employment, national income, the balance of payments, exchange rates, inflation, growth and money.  
  • Economic policy with an understanding of analytical methods and model-based argument and of different methodological approaches and their strengths and limitations.   
  • Ability to apply core economic theory and economic reasoning to applied topics.
Culture and Society
  • To familiarise students with the discipline of cultural studies and question the taken-grantedness of the ‘everyday’ in society.
  • To enable students to undertake basic cultural analysis.
  • To develop a critical understanding of key areas of culture and society.
  • To appreciate the relation between particular cultural phenomena and the representations of everyday life, and their broader context.

Learning outcomes: 

  • Theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of culture and epistemological problems associated with archiving and representing the everyday. 
  • Key areas of contemporary culture.

Typical optional modules  

Approaches to Global Politics 

By the end of the module you will:

  • Be able to appreciate the nature and complexity of global politics.
  • Have a grasp of the theoretical underpinnings of the major approaches to global politics.
  • Have a good working knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the major approaches to global politics.
  • Be familiar with the core concepts and controversies in analysing global politics. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding: knowledge of foundations of the definition and explanations of global politics.
  • Intellectual skills: ability to critically read primary and secondary material and use it effectively and appropriately in essays and in examinations. 
  • Professional/Practical skills: ability to give oral presentations and to contribute to discussions and debates in tutorial groups. 
  • Transferable & Key skills: ability to critically read primary and secondary material and use it selectively in essays and in examinations.
Global Music Studies

The module aims to introduce students to: 

  • A wide range of contexts and styles of music from around the world.
  • Facilitate the development of critical skills for the analysis of diverse musical practices.
  • Give students an introductory grounding in the terms, concepts, and principal debates in the fields of ethnomusicology and popular music studies.

Learning outcomes: 

  • Awareness of cultural differences and of ethnomusicological approaches to the study of other cultures.
  • Development of critical perspectives on the meanings of musics in different cultures.
  • Introduction to a diverse range of music cultures.
  • Ability to situate one’s own musical experience(s) in global contexts.
  • Awareness of debates surrounding the term ‘World Music’. 
  • Development of a critical understanding of the key issues in Anglophone and Asian popular musics.
Identifying and Understanding Special Education Needs

The module provides an introduction to understanding and identifying the issues around working with pupils with special educational needs within the school context.  It considers the ways in which these special needs can act as barriers to learning and examines how we identify and diagnose special needs and how different countries and systems deal with special needs in developing educational policy.

Introduction to European Union Politics
To provide a broad introduction to the history, politics, and economics of the European Union. Also, to introduce students to the study of the European Union from a political economy perspective.  

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding
    On completion of the module, students should be in a position to:
    • Demonstrate a basic knowledge in the area of the European Union, its history, economics and institutional set-up.
    • Understand the role or treaties in international law.
    • Understand the economics of the EU (Trade theory, currencies, fiscal budget).
    • Develop a basic awareness of the possibilities and limits of European integration.
  • Intellectual Skills:
    • Think about the ongoing process of European integration in a reflective and critical way.
    • The ability to link empirical material to theoretical approaches.
  • Professional/Practical Skills
    • Absorb and disseminate large quantities of data in a clear and concise manner.
    • Have the confidence to discuss issues of an abstract nature as well as linking these debates to concrete empirical examples (to be practised in tutorial sessions).
  • Transferable & Key Skills
    • Through active participation in the module the students will acquire: 
      • The research skills necessary for carrying out thorough analysis on the European Union.
      • The capacity to engage in a structured and well informed discussion about complex questions (to be practised in class discussions).
      • The ability to write in a structured and concise way under time pressure (to be assessed in the exam).
      • The skill to write a thought-through, well argued longer piece of work (to be assessed in the essay).
  • IT Skills:
    • The ability to deliver a professional, word processed document with accompanying bibliography and footnotes. 
    • The skill to draw information and documents from WebCT and conduct online research via online journals and elibrary functions.
Literacy in Schools and Society
The module provides an introduction to understanding the changing role literacy plays in school and society in transforming lives. It raises students’ awareness of what research suggests about elements that support and challenge literacy acquisition, with highlights to ESL learners.It also considers new developments in the teaching of literacy throughout the life-span, including key techniques in developing literacy skills in inclusive contexts.  

Learning outcomes: 
 

  • A broad understanding of the nature of literacy and literacy problems.
  • A basic understanding of how literacy impacts on schools and society.
  • An appreciation of the changing environments in which the teaching of literacy has developed.
  • Knowledge of the current debates about effective ways to teach early literacy. 
Media and Communications Theory
  • To familiarise students with the interdisciplinary field of communications theory, including communication technologies.
  • To encourage students to discriminate between particular theoretical positions.
  • To enable students to analyse a range of communicative texts, acts and contexts and the impact of technology upon communications practice.
  • To enable students to reflect upon their own technologised communications practices. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • A broad knowledge of the terrain of communications theory as well as an understanding of the historical evolution and contemporary forms of information and communications technologies.
  • The theoretical equipment to deal with a wide range of communications situations.
  • A glossary of key terms, concepts and models relevant to the field of communications studies.
Producing Film and Television

By the end of the module, students should be able to: 

  • Identify and critically analyse key developments in film/television production in historical terms.
  • Understand and develop a chronological awareness of the series of significant transitional moments in production histories.
  • Gain skills to research production histories, including working with primary and secondary materials and evaluating different forms of evidence. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • The place and roles of film and television in everyday life both as industry and as cultural practice.
  • The political, economic and cultural contexts from which cinema and broadcast productions and institutional practices have emerged.
  • The role of technology in shaping the development of practices in film and television production, distribution and consumption.
  • The historical development of film and television as cultural and industrial practices.
  • The structures and dynamics governing the relationships between cinema, television and other cultural.
Reading Film and Television
  • To introduce students to the formal textual analysis of aspects of film and TV narrative.
  • To examine the roles and contribution of filmmakers to the filmmaking process.
  • To examine these issues and related debates through the study of individual films and television programmes. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • The political, economic and cultural contexts from which cinema and institutional practices have emerged.
  • The role of technology in shaping the development of practices in film production, distribution and consumption.
  • The wide range of film and television aesthetics, the way their judgment is constructed and their processes experienced. 
The Influence of English 
This module examines the influence of English as an international language. It provides students with an overview of the historical, literary, and social development of English including its spread as a global language through the processes of colonisation and globalisation. It also considers how English continues to evolve in the 20th and 21st Century as an international lingua franca and focuses on its prominent role in global communications and as a resource for the shaping of identities and knowledge across the world. This module draws from a range of analytical approaches including historical linguistics, stylistics, sociolinguistics, multimodality, and globalisation theories.
The Making of Modern Asia
  • Understand selected key concepts for the study of modern politics (imperialism, nationalism, liberalism, communism, capitalism, globalisation, regimes, Orientalism, Occidentalism, political legitimacy). 
  • Have the capacity to apply those concepts to a study of modern Asia. 
  • Demonstrate broad understanding of major events and trends that have shaped the politic of modern Asian states. 
  • Communicate understanding to a defined audience. 
  • Undertake relevant research and develop evidence based argument and analysis. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding:
    • Students will gain knowledge of the contested politics of modern Asia and possess the conceptual tools to analyses these contestsstudents will develop understanding of the interests and identities behind these contestations.
  • Intellectual skills: 
    • Think reflectively and critically about the connection between concepts and empirical analysis;Develop critical skills of analysis in relation to one of the contested arenas.
  • Professional and practical skills: 
    • Develop communication skills for specified audiences.
    • Connect evidence to persuasive argument.
    • Independent learning. 
  • Transferable (key) skills: 
    • Through active participation in the module students will acquire:
      • The capacity to engage in structured and well informed discussion about complex questions (class discussions).
      • Skills of rhetoric (to be practiced in the op-ed piece, communication project).
      • The ability to write in a structured and analytical manner (to be assessed in the research report).
      • The ability to productively work in groups to achieve specified objectives. 
The Survey of English Literature and Drama 
This is a full-year module that introduces students to a range of core texts in the literary canon from medieval till 21st century. It aims to provide students with a background to the history of English literature and drama, and provide a broad overview of the key developments in terms of genre, subject matter, style and reception. Students will explore a range of texts including Beowulf and Dream of the Rood, and works from authors including Chaucer, Shakespeare, Wycherley, Henry Fielding, Laurence Sterne, Wordsworth, Jane Austen, Dickens, Wilde, and Virginia Woolf to twenty-first century novel and poetry. The authors will be situated within their socio-historic context, and we will consider the relationship between culture, history and literature.
Understanding Schools and Schooling
               

Year two 

Typical core modules  

Advanced Research Methods 
  • Provide an overview of and insight into the basic and advanced techniques of data collection.
  • Discuss examples of both qualitative and quantitative analytic techniques.
  • To have the knowledge and skills to perform statistical procedures, and know when their use is appropriate.
  • Apply your knowledge of quantitative techniques in the use of SPSS

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and Understanding: 
    • The theoretical underpinnings of areas of research and practice in applied psychology.
  • Intellectual Skills: 
    • Effective quantitative and qualitative problem solving and decision making skills.
  • Professional Practical Skills: 
    • Numeracy and quantitative/qualitative skills including data analysis, interpretation and extrapolation and the ability to work with case studies. 
    • The ability to conduct research into applied psychology and/or business and management issues, either individually or as part of a team.
  • Transferable (Key) Skills:  
    • Effective self-management in terms of time, planning and behaviour, motivation, self-starting, individual initiative and enterprise. 
    • Problem solving in applied psychology, and being able to integrate applied psychology with management studies. 
Cultural Politics
  • To familiarise students with the ethical and political dimensions of cultural and critical theory.
  • To encourage students to make politicised decisions regarding the appropriateness of particular theoretical approaches to concrete situations.
  • To enable students to analyse the complex cultural politics of their own everyday lives.   

Learning outcomes: 

  • A broad knowledge of the terrain of cultural politics.
  • Theoretical techniques for the analysis of cultural forms and practices with an awareness of their political impact.
  • Knowledge of the forms taken by power relationships within culture.
  • Aan appreciation of the processes by which power/ideology enters our lives and affects everyday experience.                                 
Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice
This module will encourage students to:   

  • Consider entrepreneurship in theory and practice.   
  • Approach ideas generation in a creative manner.   
  • Understand the usefulness of entrepreneurial skills in multiple contexts.   
  • Understand the role and nature of new business concepts and their development.

Learning outcomes: 

  • The dynamic and changing nature of business and the consideration of the future of organisations within the global business environment, including the management of risk.   
  • The development, access and operation of markets for resources, goods and services.  
  • The management of customer expectations, relationships and development of service excellence.   
  • The sources, uses and management of finance.   
  • The management of resources.   
  • The comprehension and use of relevant communications for application in business and management, including the use of digital tools.   
  • The use of risk management techniques and business continuity planning to help maximise achievement of strategic objectives.   
  • The need for individuals and organisations to manage responsibly and sustainably and behave ethically in relation to social, cultural, economic and environmental issues.   
  • Taking innovative business ideas to create new products, services or organisations including the identification of Intellectual Property and appreciation of its value.
Intermediate French, German, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin or Spanish (full year)

The overall aim of the module is to develop further competence in the language by improving the four skills of speaking, reading, listening and writing. Students will continue to develop their awareness of autonomy in language learning under the guidance of their language tutor. Teaching is communicative with regular opportunities for pair- and group- work. Emphasis is placed on oral and aural skills, making full use of multi-modal resources available. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • The language structure at post- beginner level.
  • More complex grammatical structures through the study of a broader range of topic areas across the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
Research Culture, Film and Methods
         

Typical optional modules  

English Through Time 
           
Film and Television in Social and Cultural Context 
  • To extend students’ awareness of the meanings of film and television texts by considering their relationships to a range of historical contexts. 
  • To demonstrate the contested nature of media practices by considering specific struggles over values and meanings.
  • To introduce students to the ways and means of studying the social and historical significance of film and television through the use of primary and secondary materials and readings. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • An awareness of the practice of studying the social and cultural meanings of films and television programmes.
  • An ability to analyse historically the relationship of film and television texts to their varying contexts.
  • To work with primary and secondary materials and readings.
Global Political Economy and International Development 
  • To gain a general knowledge of the major theoretical perspectives in international political economy.
  • To appreciate the merits and demerits of these perspectives as they are applied to account for the changing political dynamics of international economic relations and development practices. 
  • To develop a basic understanding of key concepts and issues in the contemporary global political economy.
  • To develop a keen awareness of the operation of power and the role of major state and societal actors in the international economic system.

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding: 
    • be able to compare and critically evaluate the core theoretical approaches of international political economy. 
    • understand substantive issues in the political economy of international trade, finance, production and development.
    • demonstrate a particular knowledge of the political and economic factors that have led to the transformation of the international economic system and global development policies and practices.
    • be able to effectively combine empirical knowledge with theoretical insight in the analysis of events and processes in the global political economy.
    • appreciate the crucial relationship between theoretical arguments, empirical analyses and policy practices in the literature on international political economy and global development.
  • Intellectual skills: 
    • ability to think about the connection between theory and empirical analysis in a reflective and critical way.
    • ability to analyse and assess a variety of approaches and methods for the study of problems in political economy and international development.
  • Professional/Practical skills:
    • evidence gathering and evaluation.
    • advanced writing skills under exam conditions.
    • independent learning.
  • Transferable & Key skills:
    • the capacity to engage in a structured and well informed discussion about complex questions (to be practised in class discussions).
    • the ability to write in a structured and concise way under time pressure (to be assessed in the exam).
    • the skill to write a thought through, well argued longer piece of work (to be assessed in the coursework essays).
International Relations of the Asia Pacific
  • Identify and describe key actors, institutions and issues in the international politics of the Asia-Pacific. 
  • Explain the causes and effects of a specific conflict in the international politics of the Asia-Pacific using relevant disciplinary insights.
  • Apply a recognised approach to the international politics of the Asia Pacific (e.g. feminism, realism, liberalism, Marxism, etc.) to a specific conflict. Compare and contrast approaches to international politics in relation to a specific conflict.
  • Evaluate the causes or propose solutions to conflicts under study. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding: 

Students will understand the historic and contemporary interests that structure state-to-state relations and multilateral cooperation in the Asia Pacific: 

    • They will understand the context-specific nature of conflicts.
    • They will be able to understand the challenges of applying theory in complex settings. 
  • Intellectual skills:  
    • Analysis of conflict using relevant theory and approaches.
    • Empathy with opposing views and solutions.
    • Critical capacity to discern deviations from declaratory policy and practice.
  • Professional and practical skills: 
    • Students will write a briefing paper for a chosen audience (foreign minister, intelligence agency, visiting delegation etc.). These will be modeled on embassy communiqués or Briefing notes issued to senior personnel in relevant international agencies.
    • Problem solving skills will be developed by students (extending from diagnosis of a problem to proposing a solution) in relation to the simulation of an international crisis.
    • Skills of rhetoric will be advanced by use of knowledge in the simulation.
    • Practices of negotiation and compromise will be enhanced and experienced in the simulation.
  • Transferable (key) skills through active participation in the module students will acquire:
    • Professional writing skills.
    • Problem solving skills.
    • Negotiating Skills.
Learning Styles and Strategies 
      
Modern and Contemporary Literature 
This module will familiarise students with relevant aesthetic, generic, and literary-historical strategies for tracing formal and thematic transformations in literature from 1910 to 1960. Moving between genres, the module will unfold chronologically from modernism, through the inter-war and post-war years. Lectures and seminars will address some key phases of creative transition, while also focusing on the work of representative novelists, poets, and dramatists. This combination of overview and textual scrutiny will encourage students to explore influences and affinities between writers working in different modes and periods. Weekly topics will primarily be concerned with mapping literary formations and innovations within the artistic and cultural contexts from which they emerge, while also addressing the wider aesthetic and ideological significances of issues such as class reformation, gender identity, racial integration, and social belonging.
Music in Film
To provide an overview of film-music history, and explore analytical and aesthetic issues associated with the medium. 

Learning outcomes: 

This module will provide students with:

  • A broad knowledge of the terrain of film music as well as an understanding of the historical evolution, and aesthetic and technical issues of the use of music in films.
  • A glossary of key terms, concepts and models relevant to the fields of music and film studies.
  • Awareness of historical, commercial and social factors in the entertainment industry. 
Political Communication, Public Relations and Propaganda
  • To familiarise students with the history of political communication and public relations.
  • To enable students to spot ‘spin’ and propaganda.
  • To enable students to understand the links between public relations, politics and the exercise of power in liberal democracies.

Learning outcomes: 

  • An understanding of the historical evolution and contemporary forms of public relations and news management techniques.
  • A knowledge of the theoretical debates around the ideological effects of public relations and propaganda campaigns.
  • An appreciation of the overt and covert information strategies employed by politicians.
Teaching Styles and Strategies
       

 

Year three 

Typical core modules  

Advanced French, German, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin or Spanish (full year)
The overall aim of the module is to consolidate and extend students’ competence to an intermediate level in the four skills of speaking, reading, listening and writing. Special emphasis will be placed on developing more sophisticated oral and written skills. Students will continue to develop their awareness of autonomy in language learning under the guidance of their language tutor. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • The language structure at intermediate level.
  • More complex grammatical structures through the study of a broader range of topic areas across the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. 
Dissertation
        
Strategic Management
To provide students of management with the key tools, concepts and frameworks of strategic analysis and to examine the process of strategy implementation. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • The dynamic and changing nature of business and the consideration of the future of organisations within the global business environment, including the management of risk. 
  • The management of resources.
  • The development of appropriate policies and strategies within a changing environment to meet stakeholder interests. 
  • The need for individuals and organisations to manage responsibly and sustainably and behave ethically in relation to social, cultural, economic and environmental issues. 
  • The development of strategic priorities to deliver business at speed in an environment where digital technology has reshaped traditional revenue and business models. 

Typical optional modules  

Comparative Political Economy in East Asia
 
Democracy and Authoritarianism in Southeast Asia
          
Documentary Film and Documentary Practice
  • To explore and define the field of documentary film and its key theoretical frameworks and its use in the field of ethnography. 
  • To deploy such theory to explore and critically analyse a range of documentary film texts. 
  • To equip students with the means to critically analyse documentary film in terms of the politics of representation, ethics and truth claims. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Understand different critical approaches to documentary film.
  • Analyse the issues of context, narrative, framing, and representation that shape the documentary as a factual media form.
Drama, Theatre and Performance
             
Gender, Sexuality and Media
  • The purpose of the module is to familiarise students with key concepts, theories and debates in feminist media studies and queer media studies.
  • To encourage students to discriminate between particular theoretical and political positions in feminism and queer theory. 
  • To enable students to analyse a range of media and cultural texts, contexts and practices through the perspectives of feminism and queer theory. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • Knowledge of concepts.
  • Theories and debates on gender and sexuality.
  • Understanding of the ways in which media and popular culture are shaped by, and at the same time shape gender and sexual norms, practices and identities.
  • Understanding of the political potential of the media engagement with issues of gender and sexuality.
  • Students will be able to critically analyse, interpret and evaluate representations of gender and sexuality in media and popular culture; and draw on the industrial context of media and reflect on its impacts. 
Literature in the Classroom
    
Malaysian Literature in English
This module explores the writings of several Malaysian writers who have emerged since mid-20th century, and especially after Malaysian Independence. The module encourages students to directly engage in literary analysis of the poetry and fiction produced by several Malaysian authors and poets. In so doing, the students directly contribute to the existing critical research on Malaysian literature in English, while also situating their studies in the general field of World Englishes. 
Materials for Language Teaching
         
Phonetics and Phonology for Language Teaching
            
Southeast Asian Film
  • To broaden your knowledge of the specific histories of cinema, film production and culture in the countries studied. 
  • To explore and define key theoretical frameworks relating to cinema.
  • To examine the relevance of such frameworks to new geographical and social contexts. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • Demonstrate understanding of the varied functions of film (as ideological/political, as social representation, as part of the culture industry or as national or as artistic expression).
  • Think, write and argue with key concepts of film form, genre, themes and theories in an applied fashion to the films from the region.
  • Reflect on and discuss your own learning as it relates to the course subject matter.
  • Comprehend and synthesize main ideas from the readings
The Teaching of Grammar
           
Writing for the Media

This module aims to: 

  • develop skills to write for the media.
  • Equip students with the necessary knowledge of writing with clarity and coherence and with responsibility.
  • Developing students’ skills and methods in researching and gathering information. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • The module will be taught through a combination of interactive lectures and workshops. By the end of the module, students will be able to put together a news report, researching and writing a feature article. You will explore the differences and similarities between writing for a newspaper and writing for a radio or TV news program. This module will help you understand the legal and ethical framework in which journalists must operate.

Careers

An international communications degree is your passport to a variety of rewarding professions. Likely career fields include: the audio-visual, digital 
and print media industries; marketing; production; public relations; and research.

Career paths in these fields include advertising account executives, copywriters and creative roles, news editors, journalists and reporters. 
Other career options include:arts or heritage administration and management; the civilservice, diplomatic or embassy work and government service; non-governmental organisations, politics and think-tanks; and consultancy, human resources, management and recruitment within the international business environment. 

Graduates with a passion for language can pursue interpreting, publishing and translation roles and others may continue their studies and pursue research and/or teaching.

Contact

School of Media, Languages and Cultures The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
t:    +6 (03) 8924 8000
f:    +6 (03) 8924 8693
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University of Nottingham Malaysia

Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih
Selangor Darul Ehsan
Malaysia

telephone: +6 03 8924 8000
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