University of Nottingham Malaysia

International Relations BA (Hons)

     
  

Fact file

Qualification: BA (Hons)
Fees: Malaysian – RM36,000 per year, Non-Malaysian – RM42,000 per year
Mode: Full time, 3 years
Intake: September
Campus: Malaysia

Course overview

International relations studies the complex relations between states and international organisations in areas such as economics, law, politics and security. Core questions include: what is security, what causes conflict, what is power and how is it exercised and justified? It also investigates deeper questions relating to how we understand and conceptualise contemporary global transformations. Our programme offers a balance between theory and practice. You will gain a broad understanding ofthe key theories and concepts associated with international relations as well as gaining practical experience of the policy process. Instrumental in this is our flagship module, Policy and Persuasion, which will prepare you to participate actively in many fields of work, including politics, advocacy and business.

Your first year will introduce you to the key analytical approaches used in the study of global politics, drawing on international political events in historical and contemporary settings. Your second year modules will focus on contemporary history, global society, political economy and security and prepare you for your final year dissertation by providing training in research techniques. You may pursue your own independent research project during your third year while taking optional modules based on the research expertise of our staff. 

Entry requirements

Our Foundation course route

Our Foundation courses give you another way to study for an undergraduate degree. 

Entry requirements
A Level BBC, excluding critical thinking and general studies
IB Diploma 28 points with 5,5,4 at Higher Level
STPM B+B+B excluding Pengajian Am
UEC 1 A and 4 B3s, excluding Bahasa Malaysia and Chinese language
SAM or other Australian matriculations
ATAR 82 (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects).
Canadian Ontario Grade 12 Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)

80% average based on 6 subjects (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects).

Canadian Secondary School Diplomas from other provinces are acceptable and to be assessed based on the University's requirements

Advance Placement (AP)

4,4,3 in relevant subjects. Applicants taking non-preferred subjects may be made an offer across more than three subjects at Advanced Placement level

Diploma - Other Institutions

Acceptance to the second year is on a case
by case basis (and at the discretion of the School) but normally would require an overall GPA of 3.3 (out of 4) or 70% and above (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects), and previous studies must meet the prerequisite requirements to the programme

Foundation - Other Institutions  Acceptance is at the discretion of the School but normally would require an overall GPA of 3.0 (out of 4) or 65% and above (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects), and previous studies must meet the prerequisite requirements
to the programme
University of Nottingham Malaysia Foundation  Successful completion of the Foundation in Arts and Education or the Foundation in Business and Management programme

We strongly encourage all interested students to apply. Our students come to us with a diverse range of qualifications and we also consider applicants' personal statement, references and interview performance (if you have one) when making a decision. The only way for us to fully determine eligibility is through the submission of a completed application.

English language requirements
IELTS (Academic):  6.5 (with no less than 6.0 in each element)
TOEFL (iBT):  87 (minimum 20 in speaking and 19 in all other elements) 

GCE A Level English Language or English Literature:

grade C  

GCE AS Level English Language or English Literature: 

grade C 
PTE (Academic): 62 (with no less than 55 in each element)
SPM:  grade A-
1119 (GCE-O): grade B
GCSE O Level:  grade C

IGCSE (first language):

grade C 

IGCSE (second language):  

grade B 
MUET Band 4
UEC:  grade A2
IB English A1 or A2 (Standard or Higher): 4 points 
IB English B (Higher Level): 4 points 
IB English B (Standard Level): 5 points 
IELTS ,TOEFL and PTE (Academic) test results must be less than 2 years old and all IELTS must be the academic version of the test. MUET results are valid for five years from the date of the release of results.
 

Foundation

The Foundation in Arts and Education is a 1+3 year programme that results in direct progression to the undergraduate degrees offered within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. This rigorous programme provides students with a strong academic background that will result in enhanced language, communication, critical thinking and study skills.  

Students on this programme also chose from a range of elective modules that provide the opportunity to sample topics related to their chosen undergraduate pathway such as politics, the world economy, media and education.

Modules

Year one

Typical core modules  

Approaches to Global Politics

By the end of the module you will:

  • Be able to appreciate the nature and complexity of global politics.
  • Have a grasp of the theoretical underpinnings of the major approaches to global politics.
  • Have a good working knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the major approaches to global politics.
  • Be familiar with the core concepts and controversies in analysing global politics. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding: knowledge of foundations of the definition and explanations of global politics.
  • Intellectual skills: ability to critically read primary and secondary material and use it effectively and appropriately in essays and in examinations. 
  • Professional/Practical skills: ability to give oral presentations and to contribute to discussions and debates in tutorial groups. 
  • Transferable & Key skills: ability to critically read primary and secondary material and use it selectively in essays and in examinations.
Governing the World: Introduction to the International System
  • Demonstrate core knowledge of International Law and Organisations (to be assessed by coursework).
  • Demonstrate a broad understanding of how International Law and Organisations can be analysed and explained in different ways according to different political perspectives (to be assessed by coursework).
  • Relate this knowledge to the world they encounter in daily news bulletins (to be practised in class discussion). 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding of:   
    • contemporary IL and IOs.   
    • Different theoretical ways to approach them.
  • Intellectual skills, such as:   
    • the ability to identify, explain, and critique the key argument in a journal article.   
    • the ability to recognise, assess, and apply a variety of approaches and methods for the study of IL and IOs.
    • The ability to engage in academic debate about the role of IL and IOs in the international system.
  • Professional/practical skills, such as:   
    • evidence gathering and evaluation.
    • summarizing and presenting information and ideas orally.
    • constructing and clearly expressing an argument in writing.   
    • Independent learning.
  • Transferable and key skills, such as:   
    • the ability to extract the main ideas and arguments from a political text and relate them to their own lives and other learning experiences (to be practised in class reading preparation).
    • the capacity to engage in a structured and well informed discussion about complex questions (to be practised in class discussions).
    • the ability to summarise and critique an academic piece of writing (to be assessed in the summary/review). 
    • the capacity to research and argue a longer piece of work (to be assessed in the coursework essay).  
    • The capacity to reflect on the relationship between theory and practice (to be assessed in all assignments).
    • Familiarity with academic databases and other forms of electronic research tools.
Introduction to European Union Politics
To provide a broad introduction to the history, politics, and economics of the European Union. Also, to introduce students to the study of the European Union from a political economy perspective.  

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding
    On completion of the module, students should be in a position to:
    • Demonstrate a basic knowledge in the area of the European Union, its history, economics and institutional set-up.
    • Understand the role or treaties in international law.
    • Understand the economics of the EU (Trade theory, currencies, fiscal budget).
    • Develop a basic awareness of the possibilities and limits of European integration.
  • Intellectual Skills:
    • Think about the ongoing process of European integration in a reflective and critical way.
    • The ability to link empirical material to theoretical approaches.
  • Professional/Practical Skills
    • Absorb and disseminate large quantities of data in a clear and concise manner.
    • Have the confidence to discuss issues of an abstract nature as well as linking these debates to concrete empirical examples (to be practised in tutorial sessions).
  • Transferable & Key Skills
    • Through active participation in the module the students will acquire: 
      • The research skills necessary for carrying out thorough analysis on the European Union.
      • The capacity to engage in a structured and well informed discussion about complex questions (to be practised in class discussions).
      • The ability to write in a structured and concise way under time pressure (to be assessed in the exam).
      • The skill to write a thought-through, well argued longer piece of work (to be assessed in the essay).
  • IT Skills:
    • The ability to deliver a professional, word processed document with accompanying bibliography and footnotes. 
    • The skill to draw information and documents from WebCT and conduct online research via online journals and elibrary functions.
Power and Contest: Living in a Political World
  • Demonstrate a particular knowledge of different approaches to power: understanding of how power shapes the political world, including identity, public policy and contests in global politics. 
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how different political issues can be analysed and explained in different ways (to be assessed by coursework and a one and a half hour exam).

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding:
    • Students will be able to empirically describe and define key concepts in political science.
    • Students will be able to critically interpret their own political views.
    • Students will be able to analyse public policy as a process of power. 
  • Intellectual skills:
    • Ability to think about the connection between theory and empirical analysis in a reflective and critical way.
    • Ability to assess a variety of approaches and methods for the study of problems in politics. 
  • Professional/Practical skills:
    • Evidence gathering and evaluation.
    • Writing skills under exam conditions.
    • independent learning
  • Transferable & Key skills:
    • The capacity to engage in a structured and well informed discussion about complex questions (to be practised in class discussions). 
    • The ability to write in a structured and concise way under time pressure (to be assessed in the exam).
    • The skill to write a thought through, well argued longer piece of work (to be assessed in the coursework essays).
  • IT skills: 
    • Understand how technology can be used as a research tool as well as to facilitate the transfer of knowledge.
The Making of Modern Asia
  • Understand selected key concepts for the study of modern politics (imperialism, nationalism, liberalism, communism, capitalism, globalisation, regimes, Orientalism, Occidentalism, political legitimacy). 
  • Have the capacity to apply those concepts to a study of modern Asia. 
  • Demonstrate broad understanding of major events and trends that have shaped the politic of modern Asian states. 
  • Communicate understanding to a defined audience. 
  • Undertake relevant research and develop evidence based argument and analysis. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding:
    • Students will gain knowledge of the contested politics of modern Asia and possess the conceptual tools to analyses these contestsstudents will develop understanding of the interests and identities behind these contestations.
  • Intellectual skills: 
    • Think reflectively and critically about the connection between concepts and empirical analysis;Develop critical skills of analysis in relation to one of the contested arenas.
  • Professional and practical skills: 
    • Develop communication skills for specified audiences.
    • Connect evidence to persuasive argument.
    • Independent learning. 
  • Transferable (key) skills: 
    • Through active participation in the module students will acquire:
      • The capacity to engage in structured and well informed discussion about complex questions (class discussions).
      • Skills of rhetoric (to be practiced in the op-ed piece, communication project).
      • The ability to write in a structured and analytical manner (to be assessed in the research report).
      • The ability to productively work in groups to achieve specified objectives. 

Typical optional modules  

Beginners French/Spanish* 

Students will learn and practise the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing together with basic grammatical structures. This will enable them to manipulate the language and participate effectively in everyday social situations. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • Pronunciation.
  • Standard spelling.
  • Ab initio syntax.
  • Ab initio sentence semantics.
  • Gist comprehension and more detailed reconstruction of audio material.
  • Basic oral skills. 
  • Intellectual skills.      
Business Economics

The module aims to introduce participants to key economic tools, concepts, and their application and to provide participants with an understanding of the nature and scope of economic policy and the economic theories upon which it is based. The emphasis is on policy. In particular, this module aims to offer a rigorous understanding of basic economic principles by combining theory and application to contemporary issues.

Learning Outcome:   

  • The development, access and operation of markets for resources, goods and services.
  • A coherent core of economic principles, including the microeconomics of decision and choice, production and exchange and the macroeconomics of employment, national income, the balance of payments, exchange rates, inflation, growth and money.   
  • Economic policy with an understanding of analytical methods and model-based argument and of different methodological approaches and their strengths and limitations.   
  • Ability to apply core economic theory and economic reasoning to applied topics.    
Culture and Society
  • To familiarise students with the discipline of cultural studies and question the taken-grantedness of the ‘everyday’ in society.
  • To enable students to undertake basic cultural analysis.
  • To develop a critical understanding of key areas of culture and society.
  • To appreciate the relation between particular cultural phenomena and the representations of everyday life, and their broader context.

Learning outcomes: 

  • Theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of culture and epistemological problems associated with archiving and representing the everyday. 
  • Key areas of contemporary culture.     
Introduction to Applied Psychology

This module introduces students to the field of Applied Psychology. It is designed to enhance students’ knowledge and understanding of:

  • Historical building blocks of Applied Psychologykey sub-disciplines in applied psychology.
  • Careers and work activities in psychology – as well as in applied settings.
  • Research methods used in applied settings, including exploring some findings.
  • Problem solving in applied psychology and its relevance in business management. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Recognise the theoretical underpinnings within areas of research and practice in applied psychology.
  • Understand how theory and research can be used to generate practical advice and interventions in everyday life.
  • Display the cognitive skills of critical thinking, analysis and synthesis - including the ability to identify assumptions and define terms.
  • Strategically apply applied psychology models to real-world problems, business and other social phenomena.
  • Be equipped to conduct research into applied psychology and/or business and management issues, either independently or as part of a team.
  • Demonstrate self-awareness, openness and sensitivity to diversity in terms of people, cultures, business and management issues and touse effective oral and written communication skills in varying contexts.
     
Media and Communications Theory
  • To familiarise students with the interdisciplinary field of communications theory, including communication technologies.
  • To encourage students to discriminate between particular theoretical positions.
  • To enable students to analyse a range of communicative texts, acts and contexts and the impact of technology upon communications practice.
  • To enable students to reflect upon their own technologised communications practices. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • A broad knowledge of the terrain of communications theory as well as an understanding of the historical evolution and contemporary forms of information and communications technologies.
  • The theoretical equipment to deal with a wide range of communications situations.
  • A glossary of key terms, concepts and models relevant to the field of communications studies.       

Year two

Typical core modules 

Global Political Economy and International Development
  • To gain a general knowledge of the major theoretical perspectives in international political economy.
  • To appreciate the merits and demerits of these perspectives as they are applied to account for the changing political dynamics of international economic relations and development practices. 
  • To develop a basic understanding of key concepts and issues in the contemporary global political economy.
  • To develop a keen awareness of the operation of power and the role of major state and societal actors in the international economic system.

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding: 
    • be able to compare and critically evaluate the core theoretical approaches of international political economy. 
    • understand substantive issues in the political economy of international trade, finance, production and development.
    • demonstrate a particular knowledge of the political and economic factors that have led to the transformation of the international economic system and global development policies and practices.
    • be able to effectively combine empirical knowledge with theoretical insight in the analysis of events and processes in the global political economy.
    • appreciate the crucial relationship between theoretical arguments, empirical analyses and policy practices in the literature on international political economy and global development.
  • Intellectual skills: 
    • ability to think about the connection between theory and empirical analysis in a reflective and critical way.
    • ability to analyse and assess a variety of approaches and methods for the study of problems in political economy and international development.
  • Professional/Practical skills:
    • evidence gathering and evaluation.
    • advanced writing skills under exam conditions.
    • independent learning.
  • Transferable & Key skills:
    • the capacity to engage in a structured and well informed discussion about complex questions (to be practised in class discussions).
    • the ability to write in a structured and concise way under time pressure (to be assessed in the exam).
    • the skill to write a thought through, well argued longer piece of work (to be assessed in the coursework essays).
International Relations of the Asia Pacific
  • Identify and describe key actors, institutions and issues in the international politics of the Asia-Pacific. 
  • Explain the causes and effects of a specific conflict in the international politics of the Asia-Pacific using relevant disciplinary insights.
  • Apply a recognised approach to the international politics of the Asia Pacific (e.g. feminism, realism, liberalism, Marxism, etc.) to a specific conflict. Compare and contrast approaches to international politics in relation to a specific conflict.
  • Evaluate the causes or propose solutions to conflicts under study. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding: 
    • Students will understand the historic and contemporary interests that structure state-to-state relations and multilateral cooperation in the Asia Pacific:
      • They will understand the context-specific nature of conflicts.
      • They will be able to understand the challenges of applying theory in complex settings. 
  • Intellectual skills:  
    • Analysis of conflict using relevant theory and approaches.
    • Empathy with opposing views and solutions.
    • Critical capacity to discern deviations from declaratory policy and practice.
  • Professional and practical skills: 
    • Students will write a briefing paper for a chosen audience (foreign minister, intelligence agency, visiting delegation etc.). These will be modeled on embassy communiqués or Briefing notes issued to senior personnel in relevant international agencies.
    • Problem solving skills will be developed by students (extending from diagnosis of a problem to proposing a solution) in relation to the simulation of an international crisis.
    • Skills of rhetoric will be advanced by use of knowledge in the simulation.
    • Practices of negotiation and compromise will be enhanced and experienced in the simulation.
  • Transferable (key) skills through active participation in the module students will acquire:
    • Professional writing skills.
    • Problem solving skills.
    • Negotiating Skills.
International Security
  • Engage with different theoretical approaches in international security.
  • Gain an understanding of the empirical development of global security since the end of theCold War with a particular focus on the Asia-pacific.
  • Investigate the breadth of issues within the field of global security.
  • Prepare students theoretically for advanced Level 3 modules in IR.

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding: 
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the subject of global security and how issues and theories can be interpreted in different ways (to be assessed by a 3000 word essay and a two-hour exam).
    • Demonstrate a knowledge of the appropriate literatures in relation to international security studies.
  • Intellectual skills: 
    • Think reflectively and critically about the connection between theory and empirical analysis.
    • Assess a variety of approaches and methods for the study of global security.
  • Professional and practical skills: 
    • Evidence gathering and evaluation.
    • Advanced writing skills under exam conditions.
    • independent learning.
  • Transferable (key) skills: 
    • Through active participation in the module students will acquire:
      • the capacity to engage in a structured and well informed discussion about complex questions (to be practised in class discussions).
      • the capacity to concentrate on core points and the ability to speak on the basis of a set of notes (to be practised in oral presentations in class).
      • the ability to write in a structured and concise way under time pressure (to be assessed in the examination).
      • the skill to develop a structured argument in a longer piece of work (to be assessed in the 3,000 word essay). 

Typical optional modules 

Comparative Politics
  • Demonstrate a particular knowledge of politics and political institutions of several counties (to be assessed by coursework, exam and quizzes). 
  • Have a nuanced understanding of political conflict in a number of countries (to be assessed by coursework, exam and quizzes).
  • Be able to apply theories of Comparative Politics to their own analyses of Politics (to be assessed by coursework, exam and quizzes). 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and understanding: 
    • Wide knowledge of contemporary Comparative Politics.
  • Intellectual skills:
    • Ability to think about the connection between theory and empirical analysis.
    • Ability to analyse critically and assess a variety of approaches and methods for the study of Comparative Politics.
    • Ability to engage in academic debate about the role of institutions and social cleavages in politics.
  • Professional/Practical skills:
    • Evidence gathering and evaluation.
    • Advanced writing skills under exam conditions.
    • independent learning.
  • Transferable & Key skills:
    • The capacity to engage in a structured and well informed discussion about complex questions (to be practised in class discussions).
    • The ability to write in a structured and concise way under time pressure (to be assessed in the exam).
    • The skill to write a thought through, well-argued longer piece of work (to be assessed in the coursework essay).
    • The capacity to reflect on the relationship between theory and practice (to be assessed in the reading assignments and presentation).
  • IT skills: 
    • Understand how technology can be used as a research tool as well as to facilitate the transfer of knowledge.
Designing International Relations Research
  • To appreciate the relevance of understanding and explanation in social science and historical research. 
  • To understand the basic structure of social science and historical research methods and the fundamentals of research design. 
  • To familiarise themselves with the basic concepts of qualitative and quantitative analysis. 
  • Where appropriate, to develop empirical research questions, construct theoretical frameworks and formulate and test hypotheses using the techniques described above. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Identify and use the appropriate techniques to develop empirical research. 
  • Recognise the strengths and weaknesses of different research methods in the study of international relations. 
  • Gain an understanding of the major approaches to conducting social science and historical research. 
  • Develop professional practical skills in the area of empirical research which is, in itself, of considerable value to employers. 
  • Develop experience in setting objectives. 
  • Develop experience in time management. 
  • Develop experience in working to deadlines IT Skills. 
  • The ability to deliver a professional, word processed document with accompanying bibliography and footnotes. 
  • The skill to draw information and documents from WebCT and conduct online research via online journals and elibrary functions. 
Intermediate French/Spanish*

The overall aim of the module is to develop further competence in the language by improving the four skills of speaking, reading, listening and writing. Students will continue to develop their awareness of autonomy in language learning under the guidance of their language tutor. Teaching is communicative with regular opportunities for pair- and group- work. Emphasis is placed on oral and aural skills, making full use of multi-modal resources available. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • The language structure at post- beginner level.
  • More complex grammatical structures through the study of a broader range of topic areas across the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.      
Political Communication, Public Relations and Propaganda
  • To familiarise students with the history of political communication and public relations.
  • To enable students to spot ‘spin’ and propaganda.
  • To enable students to understand the links between public relations, politics and the exercise of power in liberal democracies.

Learning outcomes: 

  • An understanding of the historical evolution and contemporary forms of public relations and news management techniques.
  • A knowledge of the theoretical debates around the ideological effects of public relations and propaganda campaigns.
  • An appreciation of the overt and covert information strategies employed by politicians.      

Year three

Typical core modules 

Dissertation: Politics, History and International Relations (for non-language students) 
To provide students with the opportunity to produce a piece of independent research in the area of either politics, history or international relations; to provide a focus for the application by students of the knowledge and skills relating to issues which they have developed from other modules on the programme; to provide quality supervision by matching the research interests of students with those of members of staff in the School of Politics, History and International Relations who are familiar with their chosen research topic. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and Understanding: 
    • On successful completion of the module students will have gained:
      • An in depth knowledge and understanding of a core theme in the fields of either politics, history or international relations; Knowledge and understanding of the major theoretical approaches to their chosen field and their applicability to their research theme. 
      • Knowledge and understanding of the relevant theoretical concepts and the ability to apply these concepts to their chosen research theme.
      • Where relevant, knowledge and understanding of the interplay between empirical research findings and the theoretical perspective adopted with respect to a specific theme.
  • Intellectual Skills: 
    • On successful completion of the module students will have demonstrated that they possess:
    • The analytic skills required for academic research in the field of either politics, history or international relations.
    • An ability to evaluate the research findings of others working in the field.
    • The capacity for independent thought to the degree which is required for research at final year under-graduate level.
  • Professional/Practical Skills: 
    • On successful completion of the module students will have demonstrated that they possess:
      • The ability to deal systematically and creatively with complex issues and communicate their conclusions clearly to others clearly. 
      • The academic skills required for a final year under-graduate level dissertation. 
      • The ability to work independently.
  • Transferable/Key Skills: 
    • On successful completion of the module students will have demonstrated that they possess:
      • The ability to communicate effectively in writing.
      • The ability to work independently, demonstrating initiative, self-organisation and time management. 

Typical optional modules 
Advanced French/Spanish*
The overall aim of the module is to consolidate and extend students’ competence to an intermediate level in the four skills of speaking, reading, listening and writing. Special emphasis will be placed on developing more sophisticated oral and written skills. Students will continue to develop their awareness of autonomy in language learning under the guidance of their language tutor. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • The language structure at intermediate level.
  • More complex grammatical structures through the study of a broader range of topic areas across the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.           
Asian Country Study: Thailand
        
Asian Study Tour: Thailand
          
Food, Hunger and Development
  • Have an understanding of the nature and causes of food (in)security, hunger and malnutrition within developing countries at micro and macro level.
  • Be prepared to engage with the theoretical demands of honours research projects. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and Understanding: 
    • Have a basic understanding of the global pattern and trends of food production, trade and consumption since 1945.
    • Understand and be able to assess the processes of change taking place within the social organisation of food systems in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
    • Understand the effects, including age and gender differences, that the above processes are having upon food security at all levels within developing countries.
    • Know and be able to evaluate the range of responses in the realms of production and exchange in food security. 
  • Intellectual skills: 
    • Understand and be able to assess the processes of change taking place within the social organisation of food systems in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
    • Understand the effects, including age and gender differences, that the above processes are having upon food security at all levels within developing countries.
    • Know and be able to evaluate the range of responses in the realms of production and exchange in food security. 
    • Articulate relationships between conceptual and practice issues in food security raised across the unit in a coherent, clear and concise way.
    • Have developed an advanced ability to draw linkages between food security and other development issues covered across the course. 
  • Professional and practical skills: 
    • Know and be able to evaluate the range of responses in the realms of production and exchange in food security.
    • Have further developed skills of essay writing, information retrieval, planning and self-reflection. 
    • Have developed an advanced ability to draw linkages between food security and other development issues covered across the course.
  • Transferable (key) skills: 
    • Through active participation in the module students will acquire: 
      • Have further developed skills of essay writing, information retrieval, planning and self-reflection. 
      • Have developed an advanced ability to draw linkages between food security and other development issues covered across the course.
Nationalism and the State: Themes and Perspectives from Contemporary Southeast Asia
      
Policy and Persuasion
  • Understand key concepts in relation to policy analysis and social change.
  • Have the capacity to apply those concepts to the study of an identified problem.
  • Demonstrate capacity to analyse a problem and offer solutions based on evidence and context.
  • Communicate understanding to a defined audience by conscious use of crafted rhetoric.
  • Undertake relevant research and develop evidence based argument and analysis.
  • Communicate understanding to a defined audience.
  • Undertake relevant research and develop evidence based argument and analysis. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Knowledge and Understanding: 
    • Students will gain knowledge of the policy and social change arena they have self-identified.
    • Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the policy and social change options for their chosen arena.
  • Intellectual skills:
    • Think reflectively and critically about the connection between concepts and empirical analysis.
    • Develop critical skills of analysis in relation to the problem being analysed.
  • Professional and practical skills:
    • Develop communication skills for specified audiences. 
    • Connect evidence to persuasive argument.
    • Independent learning.
  • Transferable (key) skills: 
    • Through active participation in the module:
      • Students will acquire:the capacity to engage in structured and well informed discussionabout complex questions (class discussions).
      • Skills of rhetoric (to be practiced in the op-ed piece, communication project).
      • The ability to write in a structured and analytical manner (to be assessed in the research report).
      • The ability to productively work in groups to achieve specified objectives. 
Politics and International Relations of the Middle East
       
Regionalism in World Politics: The Case of ASEAN 
    

*International relations with a language students only. 

Careers

Our degrees will equip you for a career in a variety of fields including aid and non-governmental sectors, finance and international businesses, foreign ministries, international media and journalism, international organisations, localand national government, lobbying and policy advice and think-tanks. The school is building up its alumni network both to keep in contact as well as explore ways of connecting current students with alumni in the world of work after graduation. 

Contact

School of Politics, History and International Relations

The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus

Jalan Broga,

43500 Semenyih

Selangor Darul Ehsan

Malaysia   
t:   +6 (03) 8924 8000
f:   +6 (03) 8924 8005 
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University of Nottingham Malaysia

Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih
Selangor Darul Ehsan
Malaysia

telephone: +6 03 8924 8000
fax: +6 03 8924 8005

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