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University of Nottingham Malaysia

Course overview

The School of Media, Languages and Cultures offers several three-year The International Communication Studies with Performing Arts pathway is conceived with a clear aim - allowing students to combine their Career with their Passion.

Performing Arts worldwide is a multibillion industry, which demands qualified practitioners in a range of positions that encompass the whole creative and production process, from performers to technical staff, from stage direction to communication and management. Our graduates will learn how to become leading voices in this fascinating field, gaining understanding on the dynamics of Creative Industries, and on the social and cultural elements inherent to them. They will have the opportunity of gaining hands-on practice in the process of development and production of music, dance and theatre shows, while developing further understanding in the field of Media and Communication.

Why choose this course?

This course is particularly intended for students with a passion for Performing Arts (including music, dance and theatre), who want to find solid career options within the field. Its core modules include Global Music Studies, Music in Film and Writing for Performance.

Modules

Core Modules

  • To familiarise students with the discipline of cultural studies and question the taken-grantedness of the ‘everyday’ in society.
  • To enable students to undertake basic cultural analysis.
  • To develop a critical understanding of key areas of culture and society.
  • To appreciate the relation between particular cultural phenomena and the representations of everyday life, and their broader context.

Learning outcomes:

  • Theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of culture and epistemological problems associated with archiving and representing the everyday.
  • Key areas of contemporary culture.

Students will learn and practise the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing together with basic grammatical structures. This will enable them to manipulate the language and participate effectively in everyday social situations.

Learning outcomes:

  • Pronunciation.
  • Standard spelling.
  • Ab initio syntax.
  • Ab initio sentence semantics.
  • Gist comprehension and more detailed reconstruction of audio material.
  • Basic oral skills.
  • Intellectual skills.

The module aims to introduce students to:

  • A wide range of contexts and styles of music from around the world.
  • Facilitate the development of critical skills for the analysis of diverse musical practices.
  • Give students an introductory grounding in the terms, concepts, and principal debates in the fields of ethnomusicology and popular music studies.

Learning outcomes:

  • Awareness of cultural differences and of ethnomusicological approaches to the study of other cultures.
  • Development of critical perspectives on the meanings of musics in different cultures.
  • Introduction to a diverse range of music cultures.
  • Ability to situate one’s own musical experience(s) in global contexts.
  • Awareness of debates surrounding the term ‘World Music’.
  • Development of a critical understanding of the key issues in Anglophone and Asian popular musics.
  • To familiarise students with the interdisciplinary field of communications theory, including communication technologies.
  • To encourage students to discriminate between particular theoretical positions.
  • To enable students to analyse a range of communicative texts, acts and contexts and the impact of technology upon communications practice.
  • To enable students to reflect upon their own technologised communications practices.

Learning outcomes:

  • A broad knowledge of the terrain of communications theory as well as an understanding of the historical evolution and contemporary forms of information and communications technologies.
  • The theoretical equipment to deal with a wide range of communications situations.
  • A glossary of key terms, concepts and models relevant to the field of communications studies.
The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules.

Core Modules

The overall aim of the module is to develop further competence in the language by improving the four skills of speaking, reading, listening and writing. Students will continue to develop their awareness of autonomy in language learning under the guidance of their language tutor. Teaching is communicative with regular opportunities for pair- and group- work. Emphasis is placed on oral and aural skills, making full use of multi-modal resources available.

Learning outcomes:

  • The language structure at post- beginner level.
  • More complex grammatical structures through the study of a broader range of topic areas across the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.

To provide an overview of film-music history, and explore analytical and aesthetic issues associated with the medium. 

Learning outcomes:

This module will provide students with:

  • A broad knowledge of the terrain of film music as well as an understanding of the historical evolution, and aesthetic and technical issues of the use of music in films.
  • A glossary of key terms, concepts and models relevant to the fields of music and film studies.
  • Awareness of historical, commercial and social factors in the entertainment industry.
  • To familiarise students with the history of political communication and public relations.
  • To enable students to spot ‘spin’ and propaganda.
  • To enable students to understand the links between public relations, politics and the exercise of power in liberal democracies.

Learning outcomes:

  • An understanding of the historical evolution and contemporary forms of public relations and news management techniques.
  • A knowledge of the theoretical debates around the ideological effects of public relations and propaganda campaigns.
  • An appreciation of the overt and covert information strategies employed by politicians.
  • To familiarise students with the wide range of interdisciplinary approaches to knowledge production.
  • To encourage students to make informed decisions regarding the appropriateness of particular methodological approaches to concrete communications contexts.
  • To enable students to identify, plan, and carry out a communications research topic of their own choosing.

Learning outcomes:

  • An understanding of the varied and interdisciplinary methods used in cultural research.
  • An appreciation of the distinction between qualitative and quantitative methods and the uncertainties and limits of particular methodologies and theoretical approaches.
  • An awareness of the implications of technological, discursive and generic mediation upon communication processes.
  • An appreciation of the importance of audiences and contexts to the understanding of communications processes.
  • An understanding of the pragmatics of research processes.

This module aims to develop students’ skills in writing for performance and through this improve their analysis and understanding of contemporary theatre and performance texts and where their own work might be located within it. Areas covered will include finding / shaping / reworking material, adaptation; genre and mode; story and plot; units of action; shape and structure, act and scene; dramatic dialogue: registers of language, rhythm and speech; dramatic action: through lines and objectives, action as relationship; space and setting; and characterisation and representation. Reading contemporary performance pieces, as well as seeing these in performance, will contribute to the students’ understanding of forms and the relationship between text, performance and production. Analysis of the same will be accompanied by the sharing, analysis and evaluation of students’ own work within the group and will affect further development accordingly.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules.

Core Modules

The overall aim of the module is to consolidate and extend students’ competence to an intermediate level in the four skills of speaking, reading, listening and writing. Special emphasis will be placed on developing more sophisticated oral and written skills. Students will continue to develop their awareness of autonomy in language learning under the guidance of their language tutor. 

Learning outcomes:

  • The language structure at intermediate level.
  • More complex grammatical structures through the study of a broader range of topic areas across the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.

This module aims to:

  • develop skills to write for the media.
  • Equip students with the necessary knowledge of writing with clarity and coherence and with responsibility.
  • Developing students’ skills and methods in researching and gathering information.

Learning outcomes:

  • The module will be taught through a combination of interactive lectures and workshops. By the end of the module, students will be able to put together a news report, researching and writing a feature article. You will explore the differences and similarities between writing for a newspaper and writing for a radio or TV news program. This module will help you understand the legal and ethical framework in which journalists must operate.

Typical optional modules

  • To provide a sound breadth and depth of knowledge of a broad range of contemporary digital communication and media.
  • To cultivate critical engagement with the different factors that have shaped and continue to shape the development of digital communication and associated media cultures.
  • To develop analytical and conceptual skills in both oral and written engagement with digital communication and media contexts from cultural, political, economic, technical and regulatory perspectives.
  • To advance students' familiarity with key debates and discourses in the field of digital communication and related media cultures.
  • To convey the skills required to carry out analysis of digital texts in their social, cultural, political and technological contexts at an advanced level.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and robust critical understanding of the numerous contexts within which digital communication and media are applied.
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the historical contexts of digital communication and media, how these have evolved, and continue to evolve.
  • Ability to assess the wider impact of the constantly evolving digital communication and media contexts including the emergence of new modes of interactive forms and practices.
  • Show a good awareness of key scholarship and other significant discourses and how they inform the study of digital communication and media and their relationship to various social, economic and cultural practices.
  • The purpose of the module is to familiarise students with key concepts, theories and debates in feminist media studies and queer media studies.
  • To encourage students to discriminate between particular theoretical and political positions in feminism and queer theory.
  • To enable students to analyse a range of media and cultural texts, contexts and practices through the perspectives of feminism and queer theory.

Learning outcomes:

  • Knowledge of concepts.
  • Theories and debates on gender and sexuality.
  • Understanding of the ways in which media and popular culture are shaped by, and at the same time shape gender and sexual norms, practices and identities.
  • Understanding of the political potential of the media engagement with issues of gender and sexuality.
  • Students will be able to critically analyse, interpret and evaluate representations of gender and sexuality in media and popular culture; and draw on the industrial context of media and reflect on its impacts.
The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules.

Entry requirements

All candidates are considered on an individual basis and we accept a broad range of qualifications. The entrance requirements below apply to 2022 entry.

A Level

BBC, excluding critical thinking and general studies

IB Diploma

28 points with 5,5,4 at Higher Level

STPM

B+B+B, excluding Pengajian Am

UEC

1 A and 4 B3s, excluding Bahasa Malaysia and Chinese language

SAM or other Australian matriculations

ATAR 82 (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects)
Canadian Ontario Grade 12 Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)

77% average based on 6 subjects (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects)

Canadian Secondary School Diplomas from other provinces are acceptable and to be assessed based on the University's requirements

Advance Placement (AP) 4, 4, 3 in relevant subjects.
Diploma - Other Institutions Acceptance to the second year is on a case-by-case basis (and at the discretion of the School) but normally would require an overall GPA of 3.20 out of 4.0 and above, including good grades in relevant subjects.
Foundation - Other Institutions Acceptance is at the discretion of the School but normally would require an overall GPA of 3.20 out of 4.0 and above, including good grades in relevant subjects.
University of Nottingham Malaysia Foundation Successful completion of the Foundation in Arts and Education or Business and Management programme.

 

We strongly encourage all interested students to apply. Our students come to us with a diverse range of qualifications and we also consider applicants' personal statement, references and interview performance (if you have one) when making a decision. The only way for us to fully determine eligibility is through the submission of a completed application.

Entry requirements in the prospectus and website may not always apply and individual offers may vary.

IELTS (Academic):

6.5 (with no less than 6.0 in each element)

TOEFL (iBT):

87 (minimum 20 in Speaking and 19 in all other elements)

GCE A Level English Language or English Literature:

grade C

GCE AS Level English Language or English Literature:

grade C

PTE (Academic):

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