University of Nottingham Malaysia

Foundation in Arts and Education

     
  

Fact file

Fees: Malaysian – RM7,800 per semester, Non-Malaysian – RM9,500 per semester
Mode: 2 or 3 semesters full-time
Intake: 3 semester programme: April and June / 2 and 3 semester programme: September
Campus: Malaysia

Course overview

The Arts and Education Foundation Programme is run by the Centre for English Language & Foundation Education (CELFE), and aimed at International and Malaysian students who would like a solid preparation for Undergraduate study.

The course is a combination of academic skills and content specific modules, providing an introductory grounding in social sciences as well as challenging work on critical thinking, academic literacy and communication skills. The emphasis on English for Academic Purposes will enable you to express complex ideas in a concise and appropriate way.

How you are taught

You will be taught in innovative ways, designed to help you learn to think issues through for yourself instead of reciting facts. You will benefit from an emphasis on discussion, exploration and evaluation of issues, as well as presenting ideas in the style and format expected at university level. This interactive and student-focused teaching style, often in groups of 20 or fewer, will help you to become an independent and active learner, and prepare you for your undergraduate studies at a British university. 

You will participate in lectures, seminars and workshops, and follow a similar timetable to a typical undergraduate. Assessment is through exams, coursework essays, portfolios, and oral presentations.

Course structure

Your foundation route depends on your skills and the amount of formal education you have undertaken. The three-semester programme is ideal if you have completed a minimum of 11 years of formal education, whereas the two-semester programme is suitable if you have completed at least 12 years of formal education, but need to enhance your skills and knowledge in order to be better prepared for an undergraduate degree. Each semester consists of ten to twelve weeks of classes and an additional one to three weeks of assessment.

Progressing to degree level

The Arts and Education Foundation Programme is the recommended pathway for students wishing to enter the following Schools: 


Note: Past students have also joined the Division of Organisational and Applied Psychology (DOAP), a division within the Nottingham University Business School, and the School of Psychology (within the Faculty of Science). If you wish to enter any of these Schools, please contact the Course Director to find out if you have met the entry requirements.  

Entry requirements

Entry requirements
3 Semester Entry

SPM/GCSE/IGCSE

5 Bs, excluding moral studies and religious studies. Consideration to be made based on relevant subjects.

IB Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) 5,5,5,5,5 excluding Personal Project. Consideration to be made based on relevant subjects.

Canadian Ontario Grade 11 Secondary School

70% average with 75% in relevant academic subjects. 

Canadian Grade 11 from other provinces are acceptable and to be assessed based on the University's requirements.

2 Semester Entry  
A Level CCC, excluding critical thinking and general studies
AS Level BBB, excluding critical thinking and general studies
STPM BBB, excluding Pengajian Am
UEC 4 B3s and 1 B4 in relevant academic subjects, excluding Bahasa Malaysia and Chinese language.
IB Diploma 24 points with 4,4,4 at Higher Level
SAM or other Australian Matriculations ATAR 74 (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects)

Canadian Ontario Grade 12 Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)

70% average based on 6 subjects (consideration to be made based on relevant subjects)

Canadian Secondary School Diplomas from other provinces are acceptable and to be assessed based on the University's requirements

High School Diploma (US Style Curriculum) Minimum final GPA of 3.0 (out of 4)

Applicants who are planning to progress to undergraduate programmes offered by Nottingham University Business School must have at least grade B in mathematics at SPM/ GCSE/ IGCSE/ High School Diploma or equivalent.

Applicants who have successfully completed 12 years of education (definitions will vary according to school system) and meet the entry requirements for the programme, may be eligible to apply for the 2-semester programme. Acceptance is at the discretion of the University.


English language requirements
IELTS (Academic):  6.0 (with no less than 5.5 in each element)
TOEFL (iBT):  79 (minimum 17 in Writing and Listening, 18 in Reading, 20 in Speaking)
PTE (Academic): 55 (with no less than 51 in each element)
SPM:  Grade B+
1119 (GCE-O): Grade C
GCSE O Level:  Grade C
IGCSE (first language): Grade C
IGCSE (second language): Grade B
IB MYP: 4
MUET: Band 4
UEC: Grade B3

Applicants who have successfully completed 12 years of education (definitions will vary according to school system) and meet the entry requirements for the programme, may be eligible to apply for the 2-Semester entry. Acceptance is at the discretion of the University.

Foundation

 

Modules

First Semester

Typical core modules:   

Computer Basics and Operations Decisions
  • Provide students with a basic understanding of computer technologies. 
  • Provide students with a basic understanding of computers and components.
  • Provide students with the opportunity to develop critical understanding of organisations by considering the basic principles of operations management.
  • Introduce students to digital revolutions and its impact on business strategy, operations and management. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Demonstrate basic understanding of computer technologies and  principles of operations management.
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify, describe and organise ideas related to computing technologies and operations decisions. 
  • Demonstrate cognitive skills of critical thinking, analysis and synthesis, including the ability to identify assumptions, to detect false logic or reasoning, to define terms adequately and to generalise appropriately.
  • Show the ability of  self-aware, teamwork, independent learning and leadership skills.
Contemporary Global Issues
  • To give students a wider perspective on some of the key social and economic issues facing the world today, such as poverty, inequality, economic growth, inflation etc.
  • To understand the inter-relatedness of many social and economic issues, problems and institutions.  

Learning outcomes: 

  • A1 - Ability to critically analyse social and economic situations and problems for the relevant factors and main inherent issues.
  • A2 - Application of relevant concepts, theories and techniques in analysing social and economic issues and in evaluating arguments and evidence.
  • A3 - Interpret economic information presented in verbal, numerical or graphical form. 
Introduction to Social Science
  • Provide a basic understanding of the nature of social science. 
  • Introduce the field of sociology and its key themes as they relate to the study of management and business and social sciences.
  • Facilitate the development of awareness of the language and methodology associated with the study of social science.

Learning outcome

  • Know and understand the underlying concepts and principles of social science as they relate to the study of business management as well as modern society. 

Second Semester 

Typical optional modules:  

Communication and Culture 
This module will develop the academic writing and study skills needed to tackle coursework assignments, oral presentation and discussion skills in English at undergraduate level. It will also introduce the cultural and academic norms and expectations of study in UK higher education. The module aims to develop the appropriate linguistic and study skills necessary for a more critical approach to academic writing and will, in turn, increase students’ confidence and speaking skills necessary to work in groups and on group projects. The study skills component will foster an independent and self-reliant approach to academic study and encourage students to use academic language accurately and appropriately. 

Learning outcomes:

  • Develop an awareness of one's  own cultural identities and an appreciation for others’. 
  • Describe cultural variations in communication styles and explain how categories of cultural values might underlie different behaviors. 
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the different types of tasks in written and oral assessment and an understanding of how to approach them. 
  • Develop listening strategies and process academic lectures into organised lecture notes and oral seminar presentation skills. 
Critical Thinking and Study Skills 
  • Introduce the fundamental components of critical thinking and study skills within the context of academic disciplines that are appropriate for business and economics students.
  • Develop skills in analysing and solving problems in the context of business by focussing on the abilities to problem solve and to present, evaluate and supportan academic argument or viewpoint.
  • Develop skills that will enable participants to develop confidence in their own reasoning, tolerance of ambiguity, flexibility and fairness in considering viewpoints
  • Develop the skills required to undertake written examinations and coursework in the foundation and undergraduate programmes taught in the Business School, the School of Economics and the Institute of Work, Health and Organisations. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of critical thinking skills required to enable students to produce high quality work in their undergraduate courses. 
  • Develop and apply the cognitive skills of critical thinking, analysis and synthesis, including the ability to identify assumptions, to detect false logic or reasoning, to define terms and to generalise appropriately. 
  • Demonstrate skills in essay and report writing and oral presentation.

Typical optional modules (choose any two)   

Foundation in Language and Literature
This module aims to introduce key areas and concepts of linguistics and literature, and develop students’ ability to analyse real-world texts using the concepts learnt. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • Demonstrate understanding of basic linguistic and literary terminologies and concepts.
  • Apply literary and linguistic approaches to the analysis of different texts.
  • Explain abstract ideas in a clear unambiguous manner in written communication. 
Oral Communications for Academic Purposes 

This module covers basic principles in spoken communication as it applies in British higher education. It develops skills in academic communication, individual and group presentations and seminar discussions and increase students’ confidence and speaking skills necessary to work in groups. It also aims to provide interactive activities to encourage students to use academic language accurately and appropriately, facilitating the transition into higher education and introducing them to British cultural and academic norms and expectations. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • Identify and apply effective communicative strategies.
  • Demonstrate the ability to present ideas effectively using the common discourse and organisational features of seminar discussions and presentations.
  • Deliver effective presentations using appropriate vocal, verbal and non-verbal delivery techniques
English for Academic Purposes 
This module aims at improving students' abilities to use grammatically correct English. It will also enable students to discover the important aspects of grammar and apply them in academic writing and academic speech. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • To develop an uderstanding of academic grammar and discourse structures for application in other areas of study.
  • To develop the ability to identify and use key academic grammar, vocabulary and discourse features in writing/speaking activities. 
  • To develop an awareness for and the ability to use long and sophisticated structures in academic discourse. 
  • To develop the ability to speak and write  in more coherent, accurate English. 
Introduction to Law 
  • Provide an introduction to the basic legal concepts and rules and the machinery in their introduction, application and enforcement as a foundation for further study in the subject.
  • Encourage the critical assessment of the value of legal rules, processes and institutions. 

Learning outcome: 

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the basic legal concepts and rules and the machinery in their introduction, application and enforcement in the context of business. 
Elementary Economics and Mathematical Skills 
  • To introduce basic economic principles and introductory algebra.

Learning outcomes: 

  • A1 - Develop an awareness of the language and methodology of economics.
  • A2 - Explain and analyse economic issues using relevant economic concepts, theories and information.
  • A3 - Operate with numbers and algebra.
  • A4 - Form and use mathematical expressions and equations
    for business and management applications.  
Social Sustainability
  • To develop awareness of the language and basic understanding of the nature of social sustainability.
  • To provide students with the opportunity to develop critical understanding of social sustainability by considering the basic principles of sustainable communities, social change, social innovation, design thinking, and social enterprises.

Learning outcomes:  

  • To know and understand the underlying concepts and principles of social sustainability as they relate to modern society and governance.
  • The ability to organise ideas gained from theoretical understanding of social sustainability principles and apply them in social, management,and social enterprise situations.
  • Demonstrate qualitative skills of business problem analysis, research and solution.
  • Demonstrate self-awareness, teamwork and leadership skills.

Third Semester

Typical core modules  

Principles of Education
It is designed to help students examine the diverse philosophical views that have affected, and are affecting, educational policy in the Malaysia and around the world. Students will explore questions about the purposes, ends, and means of education, and assess their own philosophy through readings, discussions, and lectures.  Students are offered the opportunity to establish a link with their own philosophies of learning and about knowledge by engaging in the discussion of topics relevant to teaching and learning and addressing core educational questions such as “what does it mean to be educated? Or, what are the bases of the knowledge informing teaching?  The module offers an overview of the epistemic and moral dimensions of education and invites students to  identify their core values and the bases of personal knowledge.  

Learning outcomes: 

  • Understand the philosophical and sociological approaches tothe school curriculum. 
  • Critically analyse the interrelationship between philosophy/sociology and actual teaching practices in the classroom. 
  • Rationally examine the socialissues affecting schools, teachers and education in a multicultural society. 
  • Self-evaluate and reflect on relevant literature as a means to  develop a personal philosophy of education and a personal understanding  of areas in education sociology.
Basic Concepts of Politics and Philosophy
  • Enhance students’ ability to engage in discussions of complex and controversial issues central to human life.
  • Develop students’ understanding of how individual choices and evolving social institutions affect human decision making. 
  • Develop students’ understanding of the relevance of philosophy in diverse disciplines, in particular, politics. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • Describe the influence and pervasiveness of philosophy in practical, day-to-day living.
  • Explain how individual choices and evolving social institutions affect human decision making.
  • Analyse and describe the relevance of philosophy in diverse disciplines, in particular. 

Typical optional modules (Choose any one)   

Quantitative Methods for Business 
To introduce basic calculus, probability and statistics. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • A1 - apply limits, derivatives, and integration to solve problems.
  • A2 - present data in appropriate tabular and graphical forms.
  • A3 - apply sets and probability to solve problems.
  • A4 - identify different types of probability distributions and apply them to solve problems. 
Business Accounting

To introduce accounting processes, concepts, reports and decision-making. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • A1 - Explain key accounting terms, concepts and principles.
  • A2 - Record and present financial information in appropriate formats.
  • A3 - Interpret financial reports.
  • A4 - Apply accounting techniques in managerial decision-making

 

OR

Typical optional modules (Choose any two)  

    • Communications Politics and Media
  • Introduce basic concepts of, politics and communication, and how they interrelate. 
  • Examine the relationship between society and contemporary media.
  • Through an understanding of media representations of society, gain an insight into aspects of society such as institutions, politicalideologies and identities. 
  • Develop students’ analytic, critical and interpretative skills.

Learning outcomes: 

  • Knowledge and Understanding: knowledge and understanding of some of the basic concepts of, and the relationship between, media and society andthereby gain an insight into aspects of society such as institutions, political ideologies and identities.
  • Intellectual Skills: analytic, critical and interpretative skills as well as an ability to apply skills and techniques to the analysis of a varietyof media texts from varying societies. 
  • Professional Practice Skills: IT skills to access media texts and to complete assignments.
  • Transferable Skills: reading, listening, writing, speaking, collaborative learning and critical thinking
English for Academic Purposes 
This module aims at improving students' abilities to use grammatically correct English. It will also enable students to discover the important aspects of grammar and apply them in academic writing and academic speech. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • To develop an uderstanding of academic grammar and discourse structures for application in other areas of study.
  • To develop the ability to identify and use key academic grammar, vocabulary and discourse features in writing/speaking activities. 
  • To develop an awareness for and the ability to use long and sophisticated structures in academic discourse. 
  • To develop the ability to speak and write  in more coherent, accurate English. 
  • The World Economy
  • Introduce students to major issues in contemporary and international history from the perspective of economics.
  • Encourage students to explore the themes of international economic development and its effect on the contemporary world.
  • Provide students with an opportunity to study the challenges facing less developed economies and the developed world.
  • Facilitate the development of awareness of the language and methodology associated with the study of economic development. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • Apply economic reasoning to different topics.
  • Work with abstract concepts and in a content of generality.
  • Justify conclusions using economic arguments with appropriate rigour. 
Fundamentals in Economics 
  • Provide an understanding of the principles of microeconomics as they apply in a business context.
  • Develop awareness of the language and methodology of economics. 

Learning outcomes:  

  • A1 - Ability to critically analyse economic situations and problems for the relevant factors and main inherent issues.
  • A2 - Application of relevant concepts, theories and techniques in analyzing economic issues and problems and in evaluating arguments and evidence.
  • A3 - Interpret economic information presented in verbal, numerical or graphical form.
  • A4 - Communicate ideas, principles and theories in a clear/concise manner through written or oral means, including using additional aids such as statistics and diagrams where appropriate. 
Principles of Applied Psychology
This module introduces students to the discipline of Applied Social Psychology by emphasizing research-based psychological principles that influence the dynamics of individual, group and organisational experiences. 

Learning outcomes: 

  • Knowledge and Understanding: The underlying concepts and principles of applied psychology and appropriate strategies to meet diverse needs in a changing environment.Intellectual skills.
  • The cognitive skills of critical thinking, analysis and synthesis: Competency in all aspects of English Language to a level required for the study of an undergraduate programmes.Study skills including critical thinking, argument,essay and report writing and oral presentation. 
  • Professional/Practical skills: The use of relevant theory and information for application in everyday and organisational environments.Self-awareness, teamwork and leadership skills

Careers

Education:

For those progressing to a degree in Education:

Careers in education are available in four main areas: public and private schools, colleges, and universities; supplementary and alternative education providers; education products industry including multimedia and conventional material development, ICT, and publishing; and education services including consultancy, research, investment services, and technology service.

English:

For those progressing to a degree in English:

The creative, analytical and communication skills developed during an English degree will equip you for the changing demands of the 21st-century workplace.

English graduates have a wide range of career choices open to them. Just a few include broadcasting, journalism, communications, the creative industries, research, publishing, teaching, lecturing, advertising, marketing, management, business, banking, law, government service, human resources and public relations.

Modern Languages & Cultures:

For those progressing to a degree in Modern Languages & Cultures:

An international communications degree is your passport to a wide variety of rewarding professions. Likely career paths include: TV, film, radio and print – producers, reporters, journalists, editors, researchers; advertising, marketing and PR – copywriters, creatives, account executives; teaching and research; publishing, translation and interpreting; government service, civil service, diplomacy, embassy work; politics, think tanks, non-governmental organisations (NGOs); international business; management, HR, recruitment and consultancy; and arts or heritage administration and management.

Politics, History & International Relations:

For those progressing to a degree in Politics, History & International Relations:

Our degrees will equip you for a career in a wide variety of fields including foreign ministries, international organisations, international businesses and finance, non-governmental and aid sectors, international media and journalism, local and national government, think-tanks, policy advice and lobbying.

Contact

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
University of Nottingham Malaysia
Jalan Broga,
43500 Semenyih,
Selangor Darul Ehsan,
Malaysia
t:   +6 (03) 8924 8000
f:   +6 (03) 8924 8005
Visit the website
 
 

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University of Nottingham Malaysia

Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih
Selangor Darul Ehsan
Malaysia

telephone: +6 03 8924 8000
fax: +6 03 8924 8005

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